Assessing commitment to reflection: perceptions of medical students

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DOI:

https://doi.org/10.36834/cmej.74265

Abstract

Background: While developing reflection skills is considered important by educators, the assessment of these skills is often associated with unintended negative consequences. In the context of a mandatory longitudinal course that aims to promote the development of reflection on professional identity, we assessed students’ commitment to reflection. This study explores students’ perception of this assessment by their mentor.

Methods: We conducted a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews with twenty-one 1st and six 2nd year medical students. Thematic analysis was informed by Braun and Clarke’s six-step approach.

Results: We identified four main themes: 1- assessment as a motivator, 2- consequences on authenticity, 3- perception of inherent subjectivity, and 4 - relationship with the mentor.

Conclusions: In the context of assessing reflection skills in future physicians, we observed that students –when assessed on the process of reflection– experienced high motivation but were ambivalent on the question of authenticity. The subjectivity of the assessment as well as the relationship with their mentor also raises questions. Nevertheless, this assessment approach for reflective skills appears to be promising in terms of limiting the negative consequences of assessment.

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Author Biographies

Joanie Poirier, Sherbrooke University

PhD student in psychology, Department of psychology, Faculty of letters and human sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec.

Kathleen Ouellet, Sherbrooke University

research coordinator, Centre de pédagogie et des sciences de la santé, Faculty of medicine and health sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec.

Valérie Désilets, Sherbrooke University

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of medicine and health sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec

Ann Graillon, Sherbrooke University

Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of medicine and health sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec

Marianne Xhignesse, Sherbrooke University

full professor, Department of Family and Emergency Medicine, Faculty of medicine and health sciences, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec.

Christina St-Onge, Sherbrooke University

full professor, Department of Medicine, Faculty of medicine and health sciences, Université de Sherbrooke and holds the Paul Grand’Maison de la Société des médecins de l’Université de Sherbrooke research chair in medical education, Sherbrooke, Québec

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Published

2023-08-08

How to Cite

1.
Poirier J, Ouellet K, Désilets V, Graillon A, Xhignesse M, St-Onge C. Assessing commitment to reflection: perceptions of medical students. Can. Med. Ed. J [Internet]. 2023 Aug. 8 [cited 2024 Jul. 14];14(4):105-11. Available from: https://journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/cmej/article/view/74265

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Brief Reports