Practical and customizable study strategies for clerkship year success

Authors

  • Hannah Johnston University of Chicago Medical Center
  • Caroline Zhao Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4194-6295
  • Yenya Hu Wake Forest School of Medicine

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.36834/cmej.75072

Abstract

The transition from a pre-clerkship curriculum to the clerkship year presents a need to re-examine and modify study strategies for clinical subject examinations and ultimately the United States Medical License Examination STEP 2 Clinical Knowledge. Efficient and effective learning are keys in balancing the significantly increased responsibility of patient care and decreased time for examination preparation.

We describe several customizable study approaches, advice on selecting resources, and methods for applying the educational framework of deliberate practice and corrective feedback to learning during a medical student’s clerkship years. These strategies focus on intentional and outcome-driven self-assessments to identify and patch knowledge gaps tailored to the clerkship year that will empower learners.

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Author Biographies

Hannah Johnston, University of Chicago Medical Center

Dr. Johnston graduated from Wake Forest School of Medicine in 2021. Currently, she is an internal medicine resident at the University of Chicago Medical Center. 

Caroline Zhao, Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University

Miss Zhao is currently a 3rd-year medical student at Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University. 

Yenya Hu, Wake Forest School of Medicine

Dr. Hu is an assistant professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine. 

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Published

2023-02-20

How to Cite

1.
Johnston H, Zhao C, Hu Y. Practical and customizable study strategies for clerkship year success. Can. Med. Ed. J [Internet]. 2023 Feb. 20 [cited 2024 May 27];14(4):112-5. Available from: https://journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/cmej/article/view/75072

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