Program foundations and beginning of concerns (part 1 of 3). When residents shouldn’t become clinicians: getting a grip on fair and defensible processes for termination of training

Authors

  • Karen Schultz Queen's University https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0208-3981
  • Andrea Risk Queen's University
  • Lisa Newton Queen's University
  • Nicholas Snider Queen's University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.36834/cmej.70170

Abstract

Training programs have the dual responsibility of providing excellent training for their learners and ensuring their graduates are competent practitioners. Despite everyone’s best efforts a small minority of learners will be unable to achieve competence and cannot graduate. Unfortunately, program decisions for training termination are often overturned, not because the academic decision was wrong, but because fair assessment processes were not implemented or followed. This series of three articles, intended for those setting residency program assessment policies and procedures, outlines recommendations, from establishing robust assessment foundations and the beginning of concerns (Part One), to established concerns and formal remediation (Part Two) to participating in formal appeals and after (Part Three). With these 14 recommendations on how to get a grip on fair and defensible processes for termination of training, career-impacting decisions that are both fair for the learner and defensible for programs are indeed possible. They are offered to minimize the chances of academic decisions being overturned, an outcome which wastes program resources, poses patient safety risks, and delays the resident finding a more appropriate career path. This article (part one in the series of three) will focus on the foundational aspects of residency training and the emergence of concerns.

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Author Biographies

Karen Schultz, Queen's University

Currently the Assessment Director for the Queen's University Department of Family Medicine.  Previously was the Program Director for 7 years.  Chair of the Certification Process and Assessment Committee for the College of Family Physicians of Canada. 

Andrea Risk, Queen's University

Ms. Risk serves as legal counsel for programs during review boards and tribunals, Queen's University Postgraduate Medical Education

Lisa Newton, Queen's University

Ms. Newton is legal counsel, Queen's University. She acts as the legal counsel for Queen's University Post Graduate Medical Education.

Nicholas Snider, Queen's University

Mr. Snider works in the Queen's University Post Graduate Education office and is the adminstrative support person for all appeals and tribunals. 

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Published

2021-06-01 — Updated on 2021-09-15

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How to Cite

1.
Schultz K, Risk A, Newton L, Snider N. Program foundations and beginning of concerns (part 1 of 3). When residents shouldn’t become clinicians: getting a grip on fair and defensible processes for termination of training. Can. Med. Ed. J [Internet]. 2021 Sep. 15 [cited 2024 May 27];12(4):116-20. Available from: https://journalhosting.ucalgary.ca/index.php/cmej/article/view/70170

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Section

Black Ice

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