Decoding the Disciplines as a Pedagogy of Teacher Education

Authors

  • Jared McBrady SUNY Cortland

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.10.11

Keywords:

Decoding the Disciplines, teacher education, disciplinary thinking, historical thinking

Abstract

This paper makes a conceptual argument for using the Decoding the Disciplines research paradigm as a pedagogical innovation in the field of teacher education. It incorporates empirical findings from a research project in which teacher candidates conduct Decoding interviews to deepen understanding of historical thinking and learn pedagogical practices. Results indicate teacher candidates benefitted from conducting Decoding the Disciplines research and saw connections between that research and their future practice.

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Author Biography

Jared McBrady, SUNY Cortland

Jared McBrady is an Assistant Professor of History and Coordinator of the Adolescence Education Social Studies program at SUNY Cortland (USA). His teaching and research focuses on the preparation of K–16 history teachers.

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Published

2022-03-01

How to Cite

McBrady, Jared. 2022. “Decoding the Disciplines As a Pedagogy of Teacher Education”. Teaching and Learning Inquiry 10 (March). https://doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.10.11.