Participant perceptions of the faculty development Educational Research Series

  • Nancy Dalgarno Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship
  • Corinne Laverty Centre for Teaching and Learning
  • Rylan Egan Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship
  • Kendall Garton Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship
  • Eleftherios Soleas Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2354-525X
  • Jordan Babando Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship
  • Richard van Wylick Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship
Keywords: educational research, educational scholarship, higher education, scholarship of teaching and learning, research approaches

Abstract

Interest in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) is driven in part by the need to provide systematic academic development for faculty anchored in evidence-based practice such as the introduction of quality assurance frameworks. This article reports on a mixed-method evaluation of one institution’s grassroots multidisciplinary faculty development program, called the Educational Research Series, to determine if it met the needs of its faculty, graduate student, and staff participants. Conducted at one mid-sized university in southern Ontario and framed, as was the program design and implementation, by both adult learning theory and constructivism, the evaluation collected data from session exit surveys, attendee interviews, and facilitator focus groups. The data analysis revealed that reasons for participating included increasing levels of understanding, receiving individual support, and learning about colleagues’ research interests. The major strengths of the program included individual learning, resources, facilitator expertise, interactive sessions, and the multidisciplinary focus. The main challenges centered on depth versus breadth of the sessions, time, and educational language and theory. Participants recommended additional resources, communication among facilitators, institutional recognition, and increased depth of content. As a result of this evaluation, an Advanced Educational Research Series is being offered at the institution. This article will inform other institutions wishing to build SoTL as a field within their institutions.

Author Biographies

Nancy Dalgarno, Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship

Nancy Dalgarno is Director, Education Scholarship at Queen’s University (CAN). She supports and conducts research in health sciences education.

Corinne Laverty, Centre for Teaching and Learning

Corinne Laverty is Teaching and Learning Specialist Librarian at Queen’s University (CAN). She supports and conducts teaching and learning initiatives through Queen’s library.

Rylan Egan, Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship

Ryan Egan is Assistant Professor, Healthcare Quality at Queen’s University (CAN). He conducts global health and health quality improvement research.

Kendall Garton, Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship

Kendall Garton is Research Assistant at Queen’s University (CAN). She conducts research in health sciences.

Eleftherios Soleas, Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship

Eleftherios Soleas is Professional Development Accreditation Lead and an Education Consultant at Queen’s University (CAN). He conducts research in health sciences and learning environments.

Jordan Babando, Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship

Jordan Babando is PhD candidate in sociology at Queen’s University (CAN). He conducts research in chronic pain and learning environments.

Richard van Wylick, Office of Professional Development and Education Scholarship

Richard van Wylick is Associate Dean, Professional Development at Queen’s University (CAN). He is a practicing pediatrician and leads the Office of Professional Development and Educational Scholarship.

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Published
2020-03-15
How to Cite
Dalgarno, N., Laverty, C., Egan, R., Garton, K., Soleas, E., Babando, J., & van Wylick, R. (2020). Participant perceptions of the faculty development Educational Research Series. Teaching & Learning Inquiry, 8(1), 221-245. https://doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.8.1.15