On the margins of SoTL discourse: An asian perspective

Authors

  • Huang Hoon Chng National University of Singapore
  • Peter Looker National University of Singapore

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.1.1.131

Keywords:

situated classroom practice, ideological exclusion, Asian perspective, unexplored participants, broadening SoTL discourse space

Abstract

The International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL) began in 2004, constituted by 67 scholars, mostly from English-speaking countries located in the Western hemisphere. Since then, the world has become increasingly global and borderless, and students’ movements across continents in search a good education have meant that today’s classrooms are, in varying degrees, heterogeneous. Yet SoTL discourse—the metaphors employed, the issues identified, and SoTL methods or approaches to classroom practice—have
remained largely Western in orientation.

This paper describes three types of exclusions of Asian participants and perspectives in mainstream discourse on the SoTL: geographical isolation, methodological solipsism, and ideological exclusion. Through a review of the dominant scholarship, we argue that an international association like ISSOTL must take active steps to consciously acknowledge the need for alternative voices that are located outside its immediate realm and that the differences in practice, participants, and the politics of culture in locations outside the West need to be taken into consideration, or ISSOTL will risk losing relevance for a greater part of world. Or to put it more positively, ISSOTL has much to gain by paying attention to and not denying the existence of such enriching, if less familiar, perspectives.

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Author Biographies

Huang Hoon Chng, National University of Singapore

Chng Huang Hoon is an Associate Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature, and an Associate Provost (Undergraduate Education) at the National University of Singapore.

Peter Looker, National University of Singapore

Peter Looker is the Associate Director for the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

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Published

2013-03-01

How to Cite

Chng, Huang Hoon, and Peter Looker. 2013. “On the Margins of SoTL Discourse: An Asian Perspective”. Teaching &Amp; Learning Inquiry 1 (1):131-45. https://doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.1.1.131.