Scholarly personal narrative in the SoTL tent

  • Laura Ng University of North Georgia
  • Mary Carney University of North Georgia
Keywords: SoTL, scholarly personal narrative, theory building, reflective practice

Abstract

Scholarly personal narrative (SPN) extends the available methodologies by which researchers conduct the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL). In this article, the authors define SPN, which interprets personal experience through scholarly frameworks, leveraging the power of reflective practice to understand the interpersonal dynamics of both the classroom and wider academic communities. SPN fosters disciplinary understandings of SoTL and bridges discourse barriers in order to illuminate the complex environments of teaching and learning. The article examines how widely-accepted definitions of scholarship apply to SPN and provides a scholarly approach for researchers to analyze personal experience as a pool of data, employ a range of analytical techniques, and identify significant results. Through an analysis of two articles, the authors discuss the usefulness of SPN both as a major and minor critical lens. The inclusion of SPN may enrich SoTL pluralism and contribute to the knowledge of the complex contexts and influences that shape instructors, learning environments, and student experiences.

Author Biographies

Laura Ng, University of North Georgia
Laura Ng is Associate Professor of English at University of North Georgia and co-director of the Faculty Academy for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at UNG.
Mary Carney, University of North Georgia
Mary Carney directs the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership and is Associate Professor of English at University of North Georgia.

References

Bass, R., & Linkon, S. L. (2008). On the evidence of theory close reading as a disciplinary model for writing about teaching and learning. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 7(3), 245-261.

Brookfield, S. (2013). Scholarly personal narratives as a new direction for the scholarship of teaching and learning. Teaching Theology & Religion, 16(2), 127-128.

Chang, H. (2008). Autoethnography as method. Walnut Creek, C.A.: Left Coast Press.

Chick, N. L., Hassel, H., & Haynie, A. (2009). Pressing an ear against the hive. Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture, 9(3), 399-422.

Geertz, C. (1973). Thick description: Toward an interpretive theory of culture. In C. Geertz (Ed.) The interpretation of cultures: Selected essays (pp. 3-30). New York: Basic Books.

Glassick, C. E., Huber, M. T., & Maeroff, G. I. (1997). Scholarship assessed: Evaluation of the professoriate (1st ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Gurung, R. A. R., Chick, N. L., & Haynie, A. (Eds.). (2009). Exploring signature pedagogies: Approaches to teaching disciplinary habits of mind (1st ed.). Sterling, VA: Stylus Pub.

Heidelberger, C., & Uecker, T. (2009). Scholarly personal narrative as information systems research methodology. MWAIS 2009 Proceedings. Paper 22.

Huber, M. T., & Hutchings, P. (2005). The advancement of learning: Building the teaching commons. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Hutchings, P., & Huber, M. T. (2008). Placing theory in the scholarship of teaching and learning. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 7(3), 229-244.

Killen, P. O., & Gallagher, E. V. (2013). Sketching the contours of the scholarship of teaching and learning in theology and religion. Teaching Theology & Religion, 16(2), 107-124.

Nash, R. J. (2002). Spirituality, ethics, religion, and teaching: A professor’s journey. New York: P. Lang.

Nash, R. J. (2004). Liberating scholarly writing: The power of personal narrative. New York: Teachers College Press.

Nash, R. J., & Bradley, L. D. (2011). Me-search and re-search: A guide for writing scholarly personal narrative manuscripts. Charlotte, NC: Information Age.

Palmer, P. J. (1997). The heart of a teacher: Identity and integrity in teaching. Change, 29(6), 14-21.

Parker, J. (2003). Writing, revising and practising the disciplines: Carnegie, Cornell and the scholarship of teaching. Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 2(2), 139-153.

Poole, G. (2013). Square one: What is research? In K. McKinney (Ed.) The scholarship of teaching and learning in and across the disciplines (pp. 135-151). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Reddick, R. J., & Sáenz, V. B. (2012). Coming home: Hermanos académicos reflect on past and present realities as professors at their alma mater. Harvard Educational Review, 82(3), 353-380.

Roethke, T. (1966). The collected poems of Theodore Roethke. New York: Doubleday.

Schön, D. (1983). The reflective practitioner: How professionals think in action. London: Temple Smith.

Shulman, L. S. (1998). Course anatomy: The dissection and analysis of knowledge through teaching. In P.

Hutchings (Ed.) The course portfolio: How faculty can examine their teaching to advance practice and improve student learning (pp. 5-12). Washington, DC: American Association for Higher Education.

Shulman, L. S. (2005). Signature pedagogies in the professions. Daedalus, 134(3), 52-59.

Shulman, L. S. (2013). Situated studies of teaching and learning: The new mainstream. Opening Plenary, ISSOTL 2013.

Tinkle, T., Atias, D., McAdams, R. M., & Zukerman, C. (2013). Teaching close reading skills in a large lecture course. Pedagogy: Critical Approaches to Teaching Literature, Language, Composition, and Culture, 13(3), 505-

Published
2017-03-29
How to Cite
Ng, Laura, and Mary Carney. 2017. “Scholarly Personal Narrative in the SoTL Tent”. Teaching & Learning Inquiry 5 (1), 133-45. https://doi.org/10.20343/teachlearninqu.5.1.10.