‘You Know What You Know’: An Indigenist Methodology with Haudenosaunee Grandmothers

  • Lori Hill Wilfred Laurier University
Keywords: Indigenist Methodology ; Indigenous Research; Haudenosaunee Grandmothers; Ethics

Abstract

This paper will reflect upon an Indigenist methodology that was used for a qualitative re-search study with 15 Haudenosaunee grandmothers from the Six Nations community who were caring for their grandchildren on a full-time basis. The guiding Haudenosaunee epistemology and world-views are highlighted. Furthermore, the processes involved in the preparation, gathering narratives, making meaning and presenting the grandmothers’ stories are reviewed. The teachings and lessons that emerge within this critical reflection are discussed and highlighted as a means of articulating an Indigenist re-search methodology that is centered in Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing.

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Published
2020-02-13