Social Work in Schools in New Zealand: Indigenous Social Work Practice

  • Awhina Hollis-English
  • Rachael Selby
Keywords: New Zealand Maori, social work in schools, Indigenous social work, school programs

Abstract

Social workers have found a new professional presence in New Zealand schools since 2001 following a pilot program in a small cluster of schools in 1999. Schools that are in low socio-economic communities have been selected to engage the services of in-school social workers. These schools have a high proportion of Maori and Pacific Island children and families in a country where Maori make up 15% of the population and Pacific Island families now make up 7% of the population. Maori social service providers are keen to employ Maori social workers so that there is congruence with their clients. These workers must then manage the multiple relationships they encounter in small rural communities in New Zealand. School social work enables helping professionals to work in health and counselling teams with families, contributing to positive Maori development and empowering families.

References

English, A., Selby, R., & Bell, H. (2011). Working with whanau: Maori social work in schools. Otaki, New Zealand: Te Wananga o Raukawa.

Ministry of Social Development. (2002). Social workers in schools expansion evaluation. Wellington, New Zealand: Ministry of Social Development.

School of Social Policy and Social Work. (2000). Evaluation of the social workers in schools pilot programme: Summary report. Auckland, New Zealand: Massey University.

Selby, R., English, A., & Bell, H. (2011). Social work in schools: A New Zealand Māori experience. Ōtaki, New Zealand: Te Wānanga o Raukawa.

Tawhara, M. (2007). Social workers in school. Three schools-one community. Three principals and their perspectives. (Unpublished research report). Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Williams, R. (2010). How has the social worker in schools programme impacted on schools from principals’ perspectives? (Unpublished research report). Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

Published
2014-12-01
Section
Articles