Aboriginal Students’ Achievement in Science Education: The Effect of Teaching Methods

  • Jimmy Bourque Université de Moncton
  • Yamina Bouchamma Université Laval
  • François Larose Université de Sherbrooke

Abstract

Some authors assume that the academic difficulties encountered by Aboriginal students can be partly explained by the discrepancy between teaching methods and Aboriginal learning styles. However, this hypothesis lacks empirical foundations. Using pan-Canadian data, we tried to identify the most efficient teaching methods for Aboriginal students and assessed whether these methods were associated with performance differences between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals in science education. Results revealed that judicious dosage and a proper balance among teaching methods seem to be required for students’ optimal achievement. In addition, only marginal differences were observed between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals. However, standard assessment methods might partly explain these unexpected results.

Author Biographies

Jimmy Bourque, Université de Moncton
Jimmy Bourque is a professor in the Department of Secondary Education and Human Resources and Director of the Centre de recherche et de développement en éducation (CRDE). He is also a member of the Centre de recherche sur l’intervention éducative (CRIE) and the Centre de recherche interuniversitaire sur la formation et la profession enseignante (CRIFPE).
Yamina Bouchamma, Université Laval
Yamina Bouchamma is a professor in the Department of Educational Administration and Foundation. Her research interests include pedagogical leadership in minority settings, exemplary schools, academic achievement, and diversity in education.
François Larose, Université de Sherbrooke
François Larose is a professor in the Faculty of Education. He is member of the Board of Directors of the Centre de recherche interuniversitaire sur la formation et la profession enseignante (CRIFPE) and of the Centre de recherche sur l’intervention éducative (CRIE). His research interests include school resilience factors in marginalized populations, school-family-community relationships in underprivileged areas, and the conditions of implementation for authentic learning contexts.
Published
2010-05-20
Section
ARTICLES