The Relationship Between Indirect Aggression and Loneliness for Emerging Adults: What Does Interpersonal Competence Have to Do with Wellbeing?

  • Maria Di Stasio University of Alberta
  • Christina Rinaldi University of Alberta
  • Jessica Sciaraffa University of Alberta
  • Clarissa Cheong University of Alberta

Abstract

The present study investigated the mediating role of interpersonal competence in the relationship between indirect aggression and loneliness for emerging adults. One hundred and sixty-seven Canadian undergraduate students aged 18-25 participated and completed an anonymous, online survey. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the mediating role of interpersonal competence in the relationship between indirect aggression and loneliness. The findings revealed that interpersonal competence mediated the relationship between indirect aggression for targets and loneliness. These findings have implications for mental health researchers and practitioners and can inform the development of prevention and intervention programs for young adults dealing with indirect aggression.

Keywords: indirect aggression, emerging adults, interpersonal competence, loneliness, psychosocial functioning

La présente étude porte sur le rôle de médiation de la compétence interpersonnelle dans le lien entre l’agression indirecte et le sentiment de solitude chez les adultes émergents. Cent soixante-sept étudiants canadiens de premier cycle et âgés de 18 à 25 ans ont complété un sondage anonyme en ligne. Nous avons eu recours à la modélisation par équation structurelle pour analyser le rôle de médiation de la compétence interpersonnelle dans le lien entre l’agression indirecte et le sentiment de solitude. Les résultats indiquent que la compétence interpersonnelle joue un rôle de médiation dans le lien entre l’agression indirecte et le sentiment de solitude. Ces résultats ont des implications pour les chercheurs et les praticiens en santé mentale et ils peuvent contribuer à l’élaboration de programmes de prévention et d’intervention visant les jeunes adultes aux prises avec l’agression indirecte.

Mots clés : agression indirecte; adultes émergents; compétence interpersonnelle; sentiment de solitude; fonctionnement psychosocial

Author Biographies

Maria Di Stasio, University of Alberta

Dr. Maria Di Stasio is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Services and Early Learning at MacEwan University. Her research interests are in the area of social and emotional development and include the understanding of bullying from ecological perspectives, adolescence development, peer relationships, teacher-student relationships, and inclusive practices.

Christina Rinaldi, University of Alberta

Dr. Christina Rinaldi is a Professor of School & Clinical Child Psychology in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta. Her research interests include parent-child relationships, parent school involvement, social and emotional development and school mental health and well-being.

Jessica Sciaraffa, University of Alberta

Jessica Sciaraffa is a PhD Candidate in the School and Clinical Child Psychology Program in the Faculty of Education at the University of Alberta. Her research interests reside in the areas of interpersonal violence and trauma, including dating, domestic and sexual violence, child abuse/neglect, cyber aggression and bullying.

Clarissa Cheong, University of Alberta

Clarissa Cheong (MEd, University of Alberta, 2016) is a PhD Candidate in the School and Clinical Child Psychology program at the University of Alberta. Her research interests include investigating the complexities of social and emotional development throughout the lifespan, and researching resilience in children, youth, and families.

Published
2020-02-12
Section
ARTICLES