Weeding Out or Developing Capacity? Challenges for Aboriginal Teacher Education

  • Julian Kitchen Brock University
  • Lorenzo Cherubini Brock University
  • Lyn Trudeau Brock University
  • Janie Hodson Brock University

Abstract

Teacher education is critical to the development of Aboriginal teachers able to ensure success among Aboriginal learners and contribute to the preservation and renewal of Aboriginal communities. In a series of talking circles, six beginning Aboriginal teachers discussed their teacher preparation and their first years of practice. They expressed concerns about teacher training programs that they regarded as assimilationist and a need for teacher education that helps Aboriginal teachers examine their individual and cultural identities in order to become effective teachers. Tribal Critical Race Theory (TribalCrit) is used as a discursive framework for critiquing existing approaches and offering culturally responsive alternatives.

Author Biographies

Julian Kitchen, Brock University
Julian Kitchen is an associate professor in the Faculty of Education. His research interests include teacher education and Aboriginal education.
Lorenzo Cherubini, Brock University
Lorenzo Cherubini is an associate professor in the Faculty of Education. The focus of his SSHRC-funded research is Aboriginal education and policy analysis.
Lyn Trudeau, Brock University
Lyn Trudeau is Ojibway, Eagle Clan. She is a master’s student and graphic artist/designer at the Tecumseh Centre for Aboriginal Research and Education.
Janie Hodson, Brock University
Janie Hodson is the Administrative Coordinator in the Tecumseh Centre for Aboriginal Research and Education. She has worked in healing and wellness in the Aboriginal community for over 15 years.