Manifesto for a new journal

Safeguarding critique in public health

Authors

  • Robin Bunton University of York, UK
  • JCPH Editorial Collective

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.55016/ojs/jcph.v1i1.78305

Keywords:

Academic publishing, Scientific critique, Commercializing journals, Critical traditions, Public health critique

Abstract

Academic publishing is in a parlous state. In the context of the rise of populist politics, the use of misinformation and the generation of mistrust in scientific expertise, the need for informed and reasoned counter-critique has never been greater. Yet, opportunities for undertaking and publishing such critique are diminishing with the increased commercialization of academic publishing and research (Speed & Mannion 2017). There is thus a very real need to hold onto the historical gains made in establishing spaces for critical engagement.  In this editorial, we reflect on this context and set out a manifesto for maintaining a space for critique in this new journal.

References

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Published

2024-02-08

Issue

Section

Editorial